All News

  •  
      Prof. Zhiming Chen was elected as the 2022 SIAM (The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Fellow for his significant contributions to adaptive finite element methods, multiscale analysis and computation, and seismic imaging.
       Prof. Zhiming Chen’s research areas are numerical analysis and scientific computing. He has made significant achievements in the study of adapt finite element method, multiscale finite element method for fluid problems in inhomogeneous porous media, perfectly matched layer method for wave-propagation problems in unbounded domains, and the source-transfer domain decomposition method for high-frequence scattering problems. He received Feng Kang Scientific Computing Prize in 2001, the Second National Natural Science Prize in 2009 and the Shiing S. Chern Mathematics Award in 2015. He was elected as the Member of CAS (the Chinese Academy of Sciences) in 2017.He was also the invited speaker of International Congress of Mathematicians, Madrid, Spain in 2006. He is now the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Computational Mathematics, Member of the editorial board of Numerische Mathematik and SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis, etc.
       SIAM is an international community, which exists to ensure the strongest interactions between mathematics and other scientific and technological communities through membership activities, publication of journals and books, and conferences. SIAM named 26 academics and professionals to its 2022 Class of Fellows for their outstanding contributions to applied mathematics and computational science through research in the field and service to the larger community on March, 31, 2022.
  • 2020 Second Prize of National Natural Science Award is awarded to Prof. Tian Ye for his extraordinary achievements in the Congruent number problem and arithmetic of L-function.
    The congruent number problem, originated in an Arab manuscript dated A.C. 972, is one of the oldest unsolved major problems in number theory, and possibly in the whole of mathematics. It is closely related to the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture, one of the seven Millennium Prize Problems.

      2020 Second Prize of National Natural Science Award is awarded to Prof. Tian Ye for his extraordinary achievements in the Congruent number problem and arithmetic of L-function.
      The congruent number problem, originated in an Arab manuscript dated A.C. 972, is one of the oldest unsolved major problems in number theory, and possibly in the whole of mathematics. It is closely related to the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture, one of the seven Millennium Prize Problems. A positive integer is congruent if it is the area of a right-angled triangle, all of whose sides have rational length. The congruent number problem is the problem of deciding which positive numbers are congruent numbers and finding the corresponding right-angled triangle for a congruent number. Predicted by the BSD conjecture, all positive integer congruent to 5, 6 and 7 modulo 8 are conjectured to be congruent numbers. At 1952, the German mathematician K. Heegner verified this conjecture for square-free positive integers with only one odd prime factor.
      In 2012, Prof. Tian Ye proved that there are infinitely many congruent numbers with any given prime factors, moreover, the BSD conjecture for the corresponding congruent elliptic curve hold. In the PNAS review, member of the Royal Society, Prof. John Coates from Cambridge University commented that Tian’s work is an important milestone in the history of this ancient problem. In addition, Prof. Tian Ye obtained important achievements on Gross-Zagier formula, twisted Fermat equations, the variation of rational points on elliptic curve under quadratic twists and Kummer extentions, and so on.
      Prof. Tian Ye received his doctorate from Columbia University in 2003, supervised by Professor Zhang Shouwu. Then he served as a member of the Princeton Institute of advanced studies, and a postdoctoral fellow at McGill University in Canada. In 2006, he joined the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research field is mainly in number theory and arithmetic geometry. Due to the breakthrough work on the congruent number problem, he won the 2013 Morningside Gold Prize of Mathematics and the 2013 Ramanujan Prize.

  •   The International Federation of Operational Research Societies (IFORS) has elected Professor Ya-xiang Yuan to the 2021 IFORS Fellows.
      Prof.Ya-xiang Yuan, is currently the Professor of Mathematics and Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. He graduated from Xiangtan University in 1981, obtained Ph.D. from University of Cambridge in 1986. He won numerous awards, including Fox Prize (1985, London), Young Scientist Award of China (1996, Beijing). Second Prize of National Natural Science Award (2006, Beijing), S.S. Chern Award of Chinese Mathematical Society (2011), the TWAS prize in mathematics(2014) and the Su Buqing Prize of China SIAM (2016). He was elected as an academician of CAS in 2011. Fellow of SIAM (2011), Fellow of AMS (2012), Corresponding Member of Brazilian Academy of Science (2014), and Fellow of TWAS (2015).
      Founded in 1955, IFORS has a long history and is the only global organization in the OR field. The IFORS Administrative Committee approved the establishment of the IFORS Fellows Award in 2020. The IFORS Fellows Award serves to recognize a distinguished individual’s contribution to international operational research and its communities.

  •   The London Mathematical Society (LMS) has elected Professor Ya-xiang Yuan to Honorary Membership of the Society. He is an internationally leading expert in optimization theory and methods. He has had a major role in developing optimization algorithms and exhibited leadership of applied mathematics in China and worldwide.
       Prof.Ya-xiang Yuan, is currently the Professor of Mathematics and Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. He graduated from Xiangtan University in 1981, obtained Ph.D. from University of Cambridge in 1986. He won numerous awards, including Fox Prize (1985, London), Young Scientist Award of China (1996, Beijing). Second Prize of National Natural Science Award (2006, Beijing), S.S. Chern Award of Chinese Mathematical Society (2011),the TWAS prize in mathematics(2014) and the Su Buqing Prize of China SIAM (2016). He was elected as an academician of CAS in 2011. Fellow of SIAM (2011), Fellow of AMS (2012), Corresponding Member of Brazilian Academy of Science (2014), and Fellow of TWAS (2015).
      
  •  
      Associate Professor WANY Haiying gave a speech titled “Nonuniform Negative Sampling and Log Odds Correction with Rare Events Data” at AMSS on June 14, 2021
       
      In the speech, he investigated the issue of parameter estimation with nonuniform negative sampling for imbalanced data. He first proved that, with imbalanced data, the available information about unknown parameters was only tied to the relatively small number of positive instances, which justified the usage of negative sampling. However, if the negative instances were subsampled to the same level of the positive cases, there was information loss. To maintain more information, he derived the asymptotic distribution of a general inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimator and obtained the optimal sampling probability that minimized its variance. To further improve the estimation efficiency over the IPW method, he proposed a likelihood-based estimator by correcting log odds for the sampled data and proved that the improved estimator had the smallest asymptotic variance among a large class of estimators. It was also more robust to pilot misspecification. He validated our approach on simulated data as well as a real click-through rate dataset with more than 0.3 trillion instances, collected over a period of a month. Both theoretical and empirical resulted demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.
       
      WANG Haiying is an Associate Professor in the Department of Statistics at the University of Connecticut. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of New Hampshire from 2013 to 2017. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Department of Statistics at the University of Missouri in 2013, and his M.S. from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2006. His research interests include informative subdata selection for big data, model selection, model averaging, measurement error models, and semi-parametric regression.

  •   Professor LIN Zongli gave a lecture titled “Solving Large Scale Semi-definite Programming and Beyond” at AMSS on May 28, 2021.
       
      For an exponentially unstable linear system subject to actuator saturation, only local stabilization can be achieved. A natural and fundamental problem associated local stabilization is the determination and enlargement of the domain of attraction. This problem involves the representation of the saturation nonlinearity and the construction of Lyapunov functions. This talk illustrated how various representations of the saturation nonlinearity and constructions of Lyapunov functions resulted in different degrees of conservatism in estimating the domain of attraction under a given linear state feedback law and in enlarging the domain of attraction by the design of the feedback gain.
       
      Professor LIN has served on the editorial boards of several journals, including those of IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, IEEE Control Systems Magazine, and IEEE/CAA Journal Automatica Sinica. He was elected a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Control Systems Society (2008-2010 and 2019-2021) and chaired the IEEE Control Systems Society Technical Committee on Nonlinear Systems and Control (2013-2015). He has also served on the operating committees of several conferences. He was the program chair of the 2018 American Control Conference and a general chair of the 13th and 16th International Symposia on Magnetic Bearings, held in 2012 and 2018, respectively. He currently serves on the editorial boards of several journals and book series, including Automatica, Systems & Control Letters, Science China Information Sciences, and Springer/Birkhauser book series Control Engineering. He is a Fellow of IEEE, IFAC, AAAS and CAA.
      
  •  
      Mr. Wang Yuan, renowned mathematician and academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and researcher of the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) at CAS, passed away on May 14, 2021 at the age of 91. He passed away at 12:46 in Beijing after medical treatment failed to cure his illness.
      Mr. Wang Yuan was born in Lanxi, Zhejiang Province on April 29, 1930, and his ancestral home was Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province. He graduated from the School of Mathematical Sciences of Zhejiang University in 1952. Recommended by Chen Jiangong and Su Buqing, Mr. Wang went to work at AMSS and followed the guidance of Hua Loo-Keng to study number theory. He once served as Director of AMSS and President of the Council of Chinese Mathematical Society. In 1980, he was elected as a member (academician) of CAS.
      Mr. Wang Yuan made significant contributions to the research on number theory and the application of methods in number theory. His work on Goldbach’s conjecture was the first major achievement for China in this field. Jointly with Hua Loo-Keng, Mr. Wang pioneered the research on high-dimensional numerical integration and developed the Hua-Wang Method. In addition, he made remarkable contributions to Diophantine analysis in algebraic number fields and the application of methods in number theory into statistical analysis. Mr. Wang Yuan constantly encouraged and supported young scholars and students to engage in academic research and learning, and made significant contributions to the modern development of mathematics and training of talents in China.
      Mr. Wang Yuan was the winner of numerous awards, including the first prize of National Natural Science Award, the Tan Kah Kee Material Science Award, the Ho Leung Ho Lee Award and the Hua Loo-Keng Prize of Mathematics. As a highly reputed scholar in international academia, Mr. Wang dedicated his entire life to scientific research and education in China. His passing away is a huge loss for the Chinese mathematical sciences.
      Mr. Wang Yuan’s farewell ceremony is scheduled to be held at the East Hall of Babaoshan Funeral Home at 9:00 am on May 20.
                                                        
       Mr. Wang Yuan’s Funeral Committee
       2021. May, 16
      Mr. Wang Yuan’s Funeral Committee:
      Directors: Xi Nanhua, Wu Jian
      Deputy Directors: Gao Xiaoshan, Hong Jialin, Gong Fuzhou, Wang Jingze
      Committee Members: Pan Jianzhong, Dai Yuhong, Zhang Ping, Feng Lei, Ding Xiaolei, Tian Sufen, Tian Ye, Li Chunying, Wang Lin, Shen Meimei
      Contact Persons: Wang Li, Li Lingzhi, Li Li, Tie Guangqiang
      Tel: 010-82541600, 82541603 Fax: 010-82541591
      Email: wangy-commemorate@amss.ac.cn (please send the letter of condolence to the above email address)
      Mobile: 13021936318, 18516985489, 13488848452
      Address: Room 928, South Building, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, No. 55 Zhongguancun East Road, Haidian District, Beijing
      Post Code: 100190
      Attached is Mr. Wang Yuan's biography 
       
       

  •   The 14th Feng Kang Prize of Scientific Computing has been honored to Dr. Weiying Zheng, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China and Dr. Jiawang Nie, University of California, San Diego, USA. For their significant contributions in Numerical methods and theories for electromagnetic problems; Polynomial optimization, convex algebraic geometry and tensor computation.
      The ceremony will be held at the General Assembly of the China Society for Computational Mathematics, Nanjing, and August 15 - August 19, 2021.
      
  • As part of the Paris Agreement, nearly all countries agreed to take steps to limit the average increase in global surface temperature to less than 2 °C, or preferably 1.5 °C, compared with preindustrial levels. Since the Agreement was adopted, however, concerns about global warming suggest that countries should aim for the “preferable” warming limit of 1.5 °C.
    What are the implications for China of trying to achieve this lower limit?

      As part of the Paris Agreement, nearly all countries agreed to take steps to limit the average increase in global surface temperature to less than 2 °C, or preferably 1.5 °C, compared with preindustrial levels. Since the Agreement was adopted, however, concerns about global warming suggest that countries should aim for the “preferable” warming limit of 1.5 °C.
      What are the implications for China of trying to achieve this lower limit?
      Prof. DUAN Hongbo from the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. WANG Shouyang from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with their collaborators, have attempted to answer this question.
      Their results were published in an article entitled “Assessing China’s efforts to pursue the 1.5°C warming limit,” which was published in Science on April 22 .
      The authors used nine different integrated assessment models (IAMs) to make their evaluation of China’s effort to achieve the warming limit of 1.5 °C.
      The various models show different emission trajectories for carbon and noncarbon emissions. The majority of the IAMs will achieve near-zero or negative carbon emissions by around 2050, with a range from -0.13 billion tonnes of CO2 (GtCO2) to 2.34 GtCO2 across models. However, one highly consistent finding among all models is that the 1.5°C warming limit requires carbon emissions decrease sharply after 2020.
      The researchers discovered that a steep and early drop in carbon emissions reduces dependency on negative emission technologies (NETs), i.e., technologies that capture and sequester carbon. One implication of this finding is that there is a trade-off between substantial early mitigation of carbon emissions and reliance on NETs, which may have uncertain performance. At the same time, the model showing the lowest carbon emissions by 2050 shows the greatest reliance on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology—suggesting that NETs have an important role in reducing carbon emissions.
      Although carbon emissions were an important focus of the study, the researchers also noted that reducing noncarbon emissions is necessary to stay under the warming limit. Specifically, carbon emissions must be reduced by 90%, CH4 emissions by about 71% and N2O emissions by about 52% to achieve the 1.5 °C goal.
      The study showed that mitigation challenges differ across sectors, e.g., industry, residential and commercial, transportation, electricity and “other.” Among these sectors, industry plays a big role in end-use energy consumption. Therefore, substantial changes in industrial energy use must occur to reach deep decarbonization of the entire economy and realization of the given climate goals. Indeed, a highly consistent finding across all models is that the largest proportion of emission reduction will come from a substantial decline in energy consumption.
      The study also highlights the importance of replacing fossil fuels with renewables, a strategy that plays the next most important role in emission reduction behind reducing energy consumption. The study suggests that China needs to decrease its fossil energy consumption (as measured by standard coal equivalent, or Gtce) by about 74% in 2050 in comparison with the no policy scenario.
      The researchers estimate that achieving the 1.5 °C goal will involve a loss of GDP in 2050 in the range of 2.3% to 10.9%, due to decreased energy consumption and other factors.
      The study also noted that China’s recently announced plan to become carbon neutral by 2060 largely accords with the 1.5 °C warming limit; however, achieving the latter goal is more challenging.
  • Prof.Ya-xiang Yuan, is currently the Professor of Mathematics and Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. He graduated from Xiangtan University in 1981. obtained Ph.D. from University of Cambridge in 1986. He won numerous awards, including Fox Prize (1985. London), Young Scientist Award of China (1996. Beijing).
      Prof.Ya-xiang Yuan, is currently the Professor of Mathematics and Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. He graduated from Xiangtan University in 1981. obtained Ph.D. from University of Cambridge in 1986. He won numerous awards, including Fox Prize (1985. London), Young Scientist Award of China (1996. Beijing). Second Prize of National Natural Science Award (2006. Beijing), S.S. Chern Award of Chinese Mathematical Society (2011), the TWAS prize in mathematics(2014) and the Su Buqing Prize of China SIAM (2016). He was elected as an academician of CAS in 2011. Fellow of SIAM (2011), Fellow of AMS (2012), Corresponding Member of Brazilian Academy of Science (2014), and Fellow of TWAS (2015).
      Founded in 1955. IFORS has a long history and is the only global organization in the OR field. The IFORS Administrative Committee approved the establishment of the IFORS Fellows Award in 2020. The IFORS Fellows Award serves to recognize a distinguished individual’s contribution to international operational research and its communities

Copyright@2008,All Rights Reserved, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science,CAS
Tel:86-10-82541777 Fax: 86-10-82541972 E-mail: contact@amss.ac.cn
京ICP备05002806-1号 京公网安备110402500020号